Tag: Disease

Effects of Periodontal Gum Disease

Statistics have shown that between 50 and 80 percent of American adults suffer from some extent of periodontal gum disease. Periodontal gum disease is caused by plaque build-up that causes inflammation of the gums. The symptoms include red, swollen, or bleeding gums; bad breath; painful chewing; sensitive teeth; and even tooth loss. With effective dental hygiene habits and regular visits to the dentist, this disease can be preceded or treated if discovered in its early stages. If it persists into its advanced stages, dental practices provide treatment to promote healthy gum tissues and prevent tooth loss.

Periodontal gum disease has many stages and forms depending on the severity and the time left untreated. The initial stage is gingivitis. In this stage, the gums are red in appearance and exhibit mild inflammation and soreness. If left untreated, gingivitis can develop into periodontitis in which the bone tissue begins to deteriorate as the gum separates from the tooth. In the advanced stages of periodontitis, the gum separates further from the tooth as the bone deteriorates even more, causing the tooth to become loose and eventually fall out. In fact, periodontal gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. It is important to see a dentist at the first signs so that it does not progress into advanced periodontitis.

The treatment for periodontal gum disease revolves around cleansing the crevice where the gum meets the tooth, called the sulcus. The sulcus becomes deeper with disease and dentists take action when they notice these gaps to restore the health of the gums and prevent losing the tooth. Dentists typically use scaling and root planning to treat infected areas. Scaling is the process of removing plaque from the tooth and root surfaces above and below the gum line and is generally followed up with the process of root planning or the smoothing of the root surfaces so the gums can heal. The final step of the treatment is oral irrigation in which water is shot into the sulcus to flush out germs and plaque. Some dentists may also use antibiotic therapy along with the treatment to reduce pain and the risk of infection.

It is important to see a dentist at the first signs of periodontal gum disease so that it does not progress into advanced periodontitis with a risk of tooth loss. Reliable dental practices can effectively treat it with scaling and root planning as well as with antibiotic therapy to further aid in the healing process. Practicing good dental hygiene habits is the best line of defense against gum disease and if it does occur, be sure to visit a dentist immediately.



Source by Vince Sandri

Prevention and Treatment of Periodontal Disease

After the common belief that if we brush our teeth they can a lifetime, there are some diseases that can affect even the most cautious cleaners. Unlike tooth decay that is primarily caused due to poor dental hygiene, gum diseases such as periodontal disease can happen to people with perfect health, albeit less frequently. Since the disease is caused due to a build-up of bacteria-filled plaque in between the gums and teeth, there is a different procedure for both preventive measures and the treatment of the diseased gum line than traditional dental care, which primarily focuses on preventing tooth decay.

Like any ailment, prevention is more effective than even the best form of treatment for periodontal disease, which with the proper knowledge can only take out about 5 minutes of your day on cleaning your teeth. While it may seem obvious, one of the easiest ways to prevent the spread of bacteria that can cause or worsen periodontal disease is to regularly brush the lower parts of the teeth that connect to the gums. Along with proper brushing with a fluoride paste, you should floss around the roots of teeth to prevent the plaque buildup that can loosen the gums and cause further complications.

It is important to be aware of the fact that some conditions that can make a predisposed individual more susceptible to developing periodontal disease. Family history of the disease can greatly increase your predisposition to being affected by it and it is a good idea to alert your dentist if it runs in your family. People who partake in tobacco use in the form of cigarettes or chew also greatly increase their odds of getting infections in their gums.

Periodontal disease is usually treatable when done early by a dentist with knowledge of the symptoms. Bleeding or receding gums and loose feeling teeth, accompanied by a lingering bad taste, may be warning signs that you are developing periodontal disease and it is urgent that you seek treatment. If you are concerned that you may have the beginning symptoms of the disease, call your local dentist and schedule an appointment so they can begin taking steps to hinder the development and prevent further infections. Untreated periodontal disease has even been linked to developing heart disease.

The standard procedure for treating periodontal disease often involves a thorough cleaning of the area of ​​the gums that corresponds to the roots of the teeth, followed up with smoothing the roots to prevent further infections. However, for more severe cases that result in tooth loss, implants and crowns may be necessary to protect the remaining teeth from further damage. If you have already diagnosed with periodontal disease or believe you have the symptoms, your dentist will give you an individualized treatment plan. Closely following this treatment plan can make a significant difference in your health.



Source by VS Singh

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Having Kidney Disease Need Not Mean You Can not Have Dental Implants

All well-experienced clinicians who routinely place dental implants will take every possible precaution when planning this treatment. This includes thoroughly assessing a patient's dental and medical health. It is particularly vital when treating people who have chronic kidney disease.

They can use this when placing dental implants in people with chronic kidney disease. The guidelines include sensible suggestions such as consulting with a nephrologist prior to surgery and following up with patients after their surgery.

Chronic kidney disease is a condition affecting approximately 11% of adults worldwide and the number of people afflicted with this disease is growing. Up to 90% of people with chronic kidney disease may have oral symptoms.

Symptoms such as gingival bleeding which is where the gums bleed, or advanced gum disease or even periodontitis can lead to problems such as early tooth loss. Another common issue is xerostomia or dry mouth, where a patient is able to produce sufficient saliva to keep the mouth clean and comfortable. When there is not enough saliva, the risk of dental disease increases which is another important factor to consider for anyone wishing to have dental implants.

One problem with chronic kidney disease and poor oral health is that these conditions can worsen each other. Poor oral health increases the risk of bacteria entering the bloodstream and affecting kidney disease.

Additionally, people with loose or missing teeth will often find its very uncomfortable to eat properly and poor nutrition can affect the kidneys. Similarly, people with chronic kidney disease are less likely to visit dentists compared to healthy patients.

A lack of good dental care increases the likelihood of dental plaque which in turn increases the risk of periodontal disease.

Furthermore, another problem is that diabetes has become increasingly recognized as potentially causing chronic kidney disease. It is an added risk factor for poor oral health. People who need to undergo hemodialysis may have advanced periodontal disease which in turn can lead to jawbone loss. These patients often receive anticoagulants which increase the risk of their gums bleeding.

Dental implantants who treat patients with chronic kidney disease are being advised to look out for dry mouth and for a condition called parotitis. This is a condition resulting in inflammation in one or more of the major saliva glands.

Often people with kidney disease will have altered saliva chemistry that can result in increased dental calculus or tartar. Thus, they are more likely to suffer from tooth loss, overcrowding, malocclusion and from loose teeth.

The treatments used can also cause oral health problems. To further complicate things, it's estimated that many have bone disorders. After this, it's been found that the alveolar bone or the jawbone is generally still fine for dental implants.

Some dentists may avoid treating people with this condition due to the increased risks. Yet, a new medical paper published in the International Journal of Oral Science has proposed guidelines for practitioners to follow.

In addition to consulting a nephrologist, the paper recommends dental implant dentists thoroughly review their patient's medical history. This includes their history of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

In addition, they recommend a complete blood count and measuring bleeding times and the implant surgery be carried out on the day after hemodialysis. This can help to minimize the risk of bleeding.

After the surgery is completed, dental implant maintenance is particularly important for patients with chronic kidney disease. These precautions can easily be carried out by an experienced and skilled dental implant dentist who already takes extensive precautions when evaluating patients for surgery. They will use the most up-to-date techniques available today.

Using Computer Guided Surgery During Implant Placement

One particular technique that can be helpful is computer guided surgery. This is increasingly being used by dental implantants wishing to provide their patients with the very best treatment.

With this technique, patients have a cone beam CT scan in addition to dental x-rays prior to treatment being carried out. A cone beam scan provides detailed 3-D images of the jaws and is used to pre-plan surgery down to the very last millimeter.

The images allow a clinician to decide where best to place each dental implant, avoiding vital structures while maximizing use of available bone. Once the surgery is planned, the treatment plan is converted into a detailed stent that is used during oral surgery. This is used to accurately replicate the plan, greatly minimizing room for error. Often, it's possible to use what's called computer guided flap-less surgery.

This is where implants are inserted directly through the gum tissue eliminating the need to make incisions into the gums to expose the underlying bone. This technique can be very useful when treating patients with medical problems. This is because it reduces the risk of infection and bleeding, plus, healing is quicker and smoother.

Is It Worth Having Implant Surgery When You Have Medical Problems?

It can seem as if there is a lot to consider for implant surgery without throwing medical problems into the mix.

With this treatment being worthwhile, should you consider another way to replace missing teeth?

There are lots of advantages in having dental implants . This treatment can provide a long-term solution for tooth loss and many people have their implants for life. With dental implants, you receive stable teeth that make it easy to eat almost anything you like.

It's easier to maintain good nutrition which in turn can help protect your general health. This could be invaluable if you have medical issues and know you have problems eating properly.

Then there are the improvements to your general sense of well-being and self-confidence. Tooth loss can be quite debilitating and many people feel self-conscious about smiling or socializing with others and will avoid sharing meals.

Implant supported teeth look extremely good. Especially as a skilled dental implant dentist will make sure they function properly and provide excellent aesthetic results, complementing your appearance.

If you do have chronic kidney disease or any other medical problems and are suffering from tooth loss, it's worth investigating the potential of dental implants.

Try to see a dentist who specializes in placing dental implants as they are more likely to have the knowledge required to properly assess your condition. They can give you an honest opinion as to whether dental implants will help you and they can discuss any possible complications. Once you know the pros and cons and possible risks, you can make an informed decision about whether to go ahead.



Source by Emma Kalman

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