Tag: Risks

Dental Crowns: Benefits, Risks and Candidacy

If you have a tooth or teeth that have become severely damaged or decided, it is important to restore their structure, strength, and function to improve your facial & smile aesthetics and boost your confidence. The dental crown procedure can be a great solution for patients with weakened or traumatized tooth / teeth.

Cosmetically, dental crowns are tooth-shaped, natural-colored coverings applied over the tooth's surface to restore its shape and size, strength, hide surface imperfections and / or rejuvenate the tooth's appearance.

Benefits

Today porcelain, ceramic, and porcelain-metal mix dental crowns, offered at most aesthetic dental clinics, are custom matched to the color of your existing teeth and are specifically designed for your smile in order to provide the most accurate, aesthetically pleasing results.

These ceramic restorations, when cemented into proper place, encase the entire misshapen or severely discolored teeth, thereby giving you a bright and sparkling smile.

Dental crowns are used to cover dental implant to comfortably work together with your existing natural teeth.

They also act as a protective cover, protecting a weak tooth from further damage or to hold together parts of a fractured tooth.

One of the most obvious advantages is that this capping of the tooth looks, feels, and functions like your natural teeth and restores your overall bite strength, thereby improving your ability to bite down comfortably.

If crafted accurately, a dental crown can help your upper and lower teeth to meet properly and maintaining a proper, balanced bite.

Risks

The risks associated with the placement of dental crowns include an increased sensitivity to heat and cold. Since your newly crowned tooth still has a nerve in it, you may experience sensitivity to cold and hot temperatures on the tooth following crown placement.

Nerve damage is another potential risk associated with this procedure. The preparation of the tooth for a crown can lead to dental nerve damage. In this case, the complete removal of dental nerves (root canal therapy) is unavoidable.

Other common risks may include loosing of crown or the loss of a crown. Loosening of crowns can be caused by a deterioration of the dental cement used to attach the crown to the abutment.

If the crown is not fitted correctly to your tooth, bacteria can easily grow between a space in the tooth and crown and further decay of the tooth under the crown may develop. Crowns may become so loose that they fall off.

Porcelain-metal mix crowns may fracture, chip or break, needing the crown replaced with a whole new crown.

Other possible complications may include risk of the carious infections, gingivitis, bleeding around the site of the crown placement and reactions to anesthesia used to numb the tooth and surrounding tissues during the procedure.

Candidacy
Dental crowns are a good option to consider for patients whose tooth has sustained some damage. It is also an ideal solution to yellow or discolored teeth.

Dental crowns also serve as an alternative to pulling the loose, chipped or cracked tooth or replacing it with a prosthetic tooth.

Patients who grind their teeth, are unable to comfortably chew food or / and which bite is not aligned properly can benefit from dental crowns.

Patients who have undergone a root canal will need a dental crown. People with an especially large dental filling may need a dental crown to preserve their major tooth.

Those who have lost their teeth to a traumatic injury or periodontal disease can have crowns together with dental implants or dental bridges.

Most importantly, dental crowns may only be recommended when the patient has a healthy dental structure and gums to support the crown. Healthy gums anchor crowns firmly in place and ensure most effective cementation of the crown.



Source by Neelam Goswami

Teeth Whitening Products: Balancing Risks and Rewards

Who would not want to look and feel young and healthy for just a few years longer? From moisturizing creams to nail polish the list of beauty products is long. Tooth whitening is just a small piece of the puzzle. At-home whitening products make a whiter smile possible for many of us. People who else can not afford expensive dentist visits can whiten their teeth for a little more than a haircut.

But there is a big difference between tooth bleaching kits and other cosmetic products. Teeth do not heal. No matter how many times we hear – "Teeth whitening is safe" – we remain cautious. That is why health conscious men and women spend more time learning about different teeth whitening options. The reward is a brighter smile; the tools are powerful bleaching chemicals. However more whitening power usually means higher risks. Life is a balancing act and tooth bleaching is no different.

The goal is to find a happy compromise; a product that provides sufficient whitening power and ensures safety at the same time. Balancing whitening power with safety is not an easy task. There are many things to consider. Oral health is the first and probably the most important factor. Individuals with less than perfect dental health should take less risk. It can mean less powerful whitening gels or a visit to the dentist. Teeth whitening strips are less effective but are considered safer than tray based whitening methods.

However there is good news to those who want maximum safety. When it comes to tooth whitening time can substitute power. In other words the same whitening results can be achieved with less powerful gels and longer application times.

The following is a list of at-home teeth whitening methods starting with the safest option:

  • Whitening toothpaste
  • Tooth whitening strips
  • Custom fit whitening trays with low concentration gel
  • Thermoform whitening trays with low concentration gel
  • Custom fit trays with high concentration gel
  • Thermoform trays with high concentration gel



Source by Tomas P

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