Tag: Procedures

Common Dental Procedures for Kids

Practicing proper dental techniques and instilling good habits from a young age is very important; however there is still a high chance that your child will require additional dental care. It is extremely important for your child to visit the dentist on a regular basis so the dentist can keep an eye out for larger issues and provide recommendations as appropriate. Below are a few of the common dental procedures needed for kids:

Regular Cleaning – While children do their best to brush and floss their teeth, it can never hurt to have them looked over by a professional. Pediatric dentists have special tools to clean in those hard to access places (ie between and behind the teeth). This also provides an excellent time for the dentist to further educate the children about dental health and its importance.

Braces- Many children will require braces in order to align and straighten their teeth and bite. Braces are recommended to children with severe underbites, overbites, crooked teeth, and various structural issues with the jaw. Depending on the severity of the issue, braces can be needed for as a little as a few months or as long as a couple years.

Retainer- Similar to braces, retainers are given to children to align teeth and keep them straight. Retainers are custom made to fit each child's mouth and are often used after braces, generally only needed at night.

Sealants- Most dentists recommend applying sealants to children's' teeth at a young age to help avoid plaque buildup and cavities later in life. Sealants are added to the pitted / indented part of the tooth (the part that does the chewing) in order to keep out food particles and sugary liquids. Sealants are essentially invisible and the children will not notice a thing. If the sealants did not provide enough protection and your child does get a cavity, the dentist may recommend metal fillings or a steel crown. A dentist for kids can assist with this and any other procedures.

X-rays- These are commonly given to both children and adults at the dentist. While your teeth may look and feel fine, X-rays can detect issues before you even know they exist. It will literally provide you with a picture of your overall dental health.

Fluoride Treatments – Fluoride can come in a variety of forms, but is most commonly given to children as liquids or gels / foams. Fluoride works to alter the structure of the tooth, making it more resistant to plaque and cavities.



Source by George V. Tobin

Dental Implants – Types and Procedures

It is now much easier to get implants to replace lost teeth or veneers to change the surface appearance of teeth thanks to recent changes in cosmetic dentistry.

Differences between cosmetic and general dentistry

Cosmetic dentistry is when a person opts to have the look of their teeth altered to improve their smile and general appearance. Although the American Dental Association does not regard cosmetic dentistry as a specialty, the procedures can produce dramatic results. Restorative dentistry is used when a person loses, chips, or breaks teeth due to trauma, cavities and tooth decay or other natural reasons.

However, before undergoing any cosmetic dentistry treatment, an individual should know first the risks and advantages in addition to what to expect during and after the procedure. It is also important to know the credibility of your dentist to perform cosmetic dentistry treatment, how much the procedure will cost, and if there are any special maintenance required after the treatment.

Dental Implants

At one time, if a person lost a tooth due to trauma, old age, or any other cause, that space in the mouth was either left blank or a denture or false tooth was put in its place. Times have changed.

Dental implants involve placing a metal rod at the jawline and putting a molded artificial tooth or crown where the former tooth was. Because the implant is fused with existing teeth, it should last a lifetime and keep your gumline healthy.

Requirements for dental implant patients

You need to have healthy gums and strong bone as the basis for the implant or dental crown. These implants have the look and feel of regular teeth and can be used to chew food or do anything that regular teeth would do.

The health condition of the patient, the condition of the gum tissues and jaws, and the size, shape, and position of the jaw bones are important considerations before doing any implant procedures. Individuals with poor dental hygiene, diabetics, and those who smoke heavily are discouraged to have implants due to higher risk of gum disease and infection.

Dental implant failure is also increased especially for people who suffer diseases of the bones like osteoporosis and for people who have been taking steroids for a long time.

What are dental implants made of?

There are three parts of a dental implant: titanium metal that is fixed to the jawbone, an abutment or post that is fitted over the part of the implant that juts out from the gums, and a crown to provide a natural-looking appearance to the implanted tooth / teeth.

The lower part of the implant is often a titanium rod that is fused to your existing jawline. Crowns are typically made of a composite resin in a whitish tooth color. In some cases the dentist may use a porcelain tooth, but it is not considered as durable for a lifetime of grinding and chewing.

The procedure for implants

Your dentist will take molds of your existing teeth and make a crown that is shaped to replace the former tooth. He or she will also choose a shade of white that is close to the shade of your existing teeth for the visible part. In this way the new tooth blends in with your other teeth and looks natural.

Two types of dental implants

The first type of implants is called Endosteal implants which are implanted directly into the jawbone through surgical procedure. Once the healing has been completed on the surrounding tissue, another surgery is required to post is connected to the first implant. The last step is attaching the artificial tooth or teeth one by one or as a group (such as a bridge or denture) to the post.

The second type is Subperiosteal implants which are made of metal frame implanted in the jawbone below the gum tissue. The metal frame will become fixed in the jawbone as the gum tissue heals. The posts that are attached to the metal frame stick out of the gums for mounting of the artificial teeth.

How long does the procedure take?

It takes several months to heal from a dental implant. If your dentist is removing a tooth that will be replaced by an implant, that will be dropped on the first day. Then the dentist places the implant anchor for the new tooth. This implant will take 3-9 months to heal, but through a process called osseointegration the titanium rod will bond with your existing jawline.

Your dentist may give you a temporary crown while the healing is taking place and in some cases your dentist will place the crown on the same day. The mold for your new tooth takes a few hours or a few days to come back to the office, so you will most likely make a second visit.

The success or failure of dental implant procedure will depend on the individual's health, the drugs that will be used to speed up osseointegration, and the health of the gum tissues. Healthy bones and gum tissues contribute greatly to the long-term success of this cosmetic dentistry procedure.

Implant side effects

Patients usually experience some pain and bleeding at the implant site. On rare occasions an infection can occur after the implant is placed. It is important to brush and floss your teeth daily to prevent this from occurring. Many dentists discouraged smokers from getting the procedure done, due to reliably higher rates of infection.

Dental Implant complications

Several risks related to having dental implants are divided into three parts: first, during the surgical procedure when there is nerve injury or too much bleeding; second, during the first six months after the surgery when oseointegration fails or infection sets in; and third, long-term occurrence such as mechanical malfunction or peri-implantitis (inflammation of the tissues surrounding the dental implants).

Summary:

Implants are a long-term solution to replace missing teeth and among one of the expensive cosmetic dentistry treatments. They are titanium artificial tooth root replacements that are inserted into the bone sockets of the missing teeth and are good alternative to bridges and removable dentures. They are surgically implanted into the jawbone by an oral or maxillofacial surgeon. If bone loss occurred due to periodontal disease, the surgeon will probably have to graft a bone first to secure the implant.

The condition of your teeth and the expected result that you want will determine which cosmetic dentistry procedure is right for you. Your dentist can answer any questions for you like what to expect through the course of treatment, what changes will look like, and what type of maintenance is required if there are any.



Source by Joe R. Stewart

[Top]

Most Common Restorative Dental Procedures

Chances are, you do not have perfect, decay and disease-free teeth and gums. Most patients have at least one cavity and have had a bout or two with minor, reversible gum disease.

Maybe you've experienced bleeding gums, tooth sensitivity or lost teeth. If you went to the dentist, the dentist likely treated the condition to halt its progress or to eliminate the condition all together.

This treatment of a dental condition after it's already begun is called restorative dentistry, which is often partly covered by dental insurance.

While preventive treatments are used to avoid a lot of pain, discomfort, embarassment, excess dental office trips, and forking over funds, sometimes things happen that are out of your control. Sometimes you do not feel the pain and discomfort of a dental problem until it's too late. Accidents and other things may also occur and necessitate some of these more serious measures.

You do not have to feel embarrassed about it, though. Most of these procedures are very common, and chances are you've already experienced some of them yourself.

The goal of restorative dentistry is to protect and preserve the teeth. Here is a list of the most common procedures:

Fillings. This is a very common restorative dental procedure while the dentist will fill a hole in the outer surface of the tooth caused by plaque and tooth decay (cavities). The fillings can be gold, amalgam or composite resin. Resin fillings are the most expensive and least likely to be covered by insurance like amalgam fillings are. Amalgam fillings are most common because they are the least expensive.

Some patients (and dentists) prefer the composite resin fillings because of their appearance and their lack of mercury, which is in traditional amalgam fillings.

Crowns. This is simply a tooth-shaped and colored covering that is cemented over a tooth that is too poorly damaged by decay. Crowns are also used on top of dental implants which replace missing teeth. They are often made offsite in a dental lab, resulting in the need for multiple dental office visits. Some dental offices, however, have the technology to make crowns onsite, giving patients new crowns in a single office visit.

Inlays and Onlays. These dental procedures are ideal for patients with chipped teeth or those whose teeth are too disappointed for fillings, but not damaged enough for a crown.

Inlays are made of composite resin that is bonded to one cusp of the tooth (located on the chewing surface of the tooth). An onlay covers more than one cramp of the tooth and is sometimes called a partial crown.

Implants. Further, and possibly more serious, dental health issues can raise from missing teeth.

Implants are used to fill in these gaps and preserve the proper stability of a patient's remaining teeth.

Implants are made of three components: the titanium rod (implant), the abutment and the crown. The titanium implant is surgically inserted into the patient's jaw where the missing tooth formerly was. The abutment is then placed on top of the implant. Finally, a tooth-shaped crown is placed on top of the abutment.

Implants restore a patient's smile as well as reserve the strength of the jawbone and proper alignment of surrounding teeth.

Dentures. Some patients, many of which who are older, have lost all or most of their teeth due to a life time of wear and tear. A toothless mouth not only takes away from one's smile and self-confidence, it can hinder one's ability to eat and speak.

Patients in these circumstances would be best treated with dentures.

There are two common types of dentures: full and partial.

Dentures have come a long way thanks to modern dental technology. Some dentists now offer patients permanent dentures, called all-on-four dentures that use dental implants to anchor the implants into place in the mouth.

While fillings, crowns, implants, inlays and onlays and dentures are the most common restorative dental procedures , there are other procedures your dentist may recommend to preserve your teeth and smile.

It is important to schedule regular visits with your dentist and have your teeth examined when there's any kind of pain or discomfort.



Source by Anna Bird

[Top]