Tag: Breast

Breast Augmentation: What To Consider Before Getting Breast Implants

The breast implant is a cosmetic surgery device that's made of either silicone (a breast-shaped bag filled with silicone gel) or saline (composed of sterile salt water), and used to adjust the size of your breasts to the desired look. This is done through a procedure that has become popular, whereby women go through surgical operations that transform their physical features to a preferred appearance, particularly the breasts.

Before any woman decides to undergo this kind of a procedure, there are various factors that she may want to consider.

Factors to Consider:

The important factors you should consider before an augmentation procedure include:

1. Cost

The cost of having breastfeeding augmentation is usually high, so you should be financially prepared before you decide to have the procedure. This is because health insurance does not cover such procedures, unless it's a breast reconstruction surgery that is normally done when a woman has suffered from cancer.

2. Pain and infections

Feeling a bit of pain is a common experience after getting a breast implant. You would experience some sort of discomfort after having the procedure too. Fortunately, patients are given some painkillers to relieve such pain and discomfort.

Moreover, you're likely to experience an itchy feeling around the breast area, which might go on for some days. In some rare instances, an infection may develop.

3. Rupturing of breast implants

When the breast implant leaks, you may experience a painful sensation; while its shape and size changes. Once a woman has undergone the first surgery it's not always a guarantee that she will not be back to have another surgery.

At times, it becomes a challenge to detect if the implant has ruptured or leaked. Consequently, you might be required to undergo a second procedure to help maintain the shape and appearance of your breast.

4. Breastfeeding

Once any person has had a breast implant, it becomes a challenge for such an individual to breast feed; unless the implant has not interfereed with your milk glands. Here, not everyone who has the surgery is unable to breastfeed.

5. Nipple sensation

Sensation on the nipple may be lost in a small percentage of women who have had surgery. Most women would still retain nipple sensation, since loss of such sensation would normally depend on the kind of surgery you've had and other aspects of your breasts.

6. Mammogram detection

Effectiveness of a mammogram for a person who has had surgery on the breasts is a challenge; her leads to possible delay of breast cancer detection. For this reason, it's very important, before you decide to have surgery that you go screening to check for any possible occurrence of cancerous cells.

7. Is the doctor certified?

Before having any surgical procedure done it's of vital importance to always ensure that the person who will be in charge of the procedure is a certified professional from a recognized governing body. In this way, you'll ensure that the doctor performing surgery is a trusted person who will maintain professionalism.



Source by Dr Kourosh Tavakoli

Silicone Implants – Do They Increase Risk for Breast Cancer?

In a word, No.

Silicone gel breast implants can have a more natural look and feel than saline implants. They have been safely used, worldwide, since the early 1960s. Only in the US has there been a ban on them, which the FDA imposed between 1992 and 2006.

FDA's 14-year restriction on silicone gel implants

This restriction was sparked by a CBS "news" report made by Connie Chung in 1990 which featured one woman who claimed without evidence that her silicone implants had caused health problems.

A media-induced panic followed, with political groups blowing on the flames, such as the National Organization of Women, who are opposed to any woman having breastfeeding implants of any kind. Attorneys swiftly took advantage of it to file class action laws against the implant manufacturers. Also enjoying the ride were many doctors, who served as highly-paid expert witnesses in these lawsuits.

Rather than trying to use the plentiful scientific data in their defense, since it was so resolutely being ignored by the attorneys and media outlets, the manufacturing companies settled with the plaintiffs, setting up a $ 4.2 billion fund from which they could have paid. This move drve down the stock values ​​of these companies, hurting many 401k accounts and other stockholders, and drve the principal manufacturer, Dow Corning, into bankruptcy.

Driven by this media frenzy, the FDA in 1992 restricted the use of silicone gel implants to reconstructive use, rather than cosmetic use, pending further research.

Subsequent studies done

In 1995 several large research studies were published which re-affirmed the non-existence of any connection between silicone gel implants and systemic diseases, such as auto-immune diseases and cancer. In 1999, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences published their report, which implicitly excluded any connections between silicone gel implants and health problems. A large study done in Los Angeles and Canada found a statistically significant lower incidence of cancer in women with breast implants.

What is silicone?

Silicon (with no "e" at the end) is one of Earth's elements, and the most abundant, after oxygen. It's found in sand, rocks, crystals etc. Silicone (with the "e" at the end) is the name for various compounds made from silicon, which can take the form of oil, grease, or plastic.

Silicone is used in thousands of ways and we all have some of it in our bodies. It's used as a lubricant in water pipes, in copy machines, hairspray, perfumes, hospital needles and syringes, pacemakers, joint implants, and many medications. Cow's milk has more silicone in it than the mother's milk of a woman with breast silicone gel implants.

In none of these silicone uses has any health problem been found.

Cancer considerations

· Diagnosing cancer in the presence of implants – no study has found any delay in cancer diagnosis because of the presence of breast implants. Implants hide anywhere between 20% to 60% of breast tissue during a mammogram, especially if they're placed above the muscle, and mammograms must be done a little differently. However, in comparing groups of women with and without implants, no significant difference was found as to the size or stage of the tumor when it was diagnosed.

· Family history of breast cancer – About one in nine women develop breast cancer, and if there's a family history of it, the chances of it recording are much higher. As a precaution, all cosmetic surgeons will do a good breast exam before any augmentation procedure, and some will have such patients get a mammogram before their augmentation.

FDA-mandated studies in the future

As a condition of the November, 2006 approval of the silicone gel breast implants made by two companies in California (Allergan and Mentor), the FDA has required that these companies conduct large follow-up studies to track the success of their implants.

These studies will be collecting data on incidences of cancer, connective tissue diseases, neurological diseases, suicide, implant rupture, reproductive issues, and others. The studies will run for ten years and the companies must submit quarterly reports to the FDA on their progress.

"A woman has a right to choose," remarked cosmetic surgeon Dr. Adrian Lo in Philadelphia, PA, who has many happy post-augmentation patients. "A woman can choose to have breast augmentation if discussions with her cosmetic surgeon to establish it to be positive in her life. , neither one of which has been shown to have any causative connection to cancer. "



Source by Adrian Lo

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